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HEART DISEASE: BYPASS SURGERY – A ROAD DESTINED TO CLOSE


   Jan 25

HEART DISEASE: BYPASS SURGERY – A ROAD DESTINED TO CLOSE

Coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG): Coronary artery bypass surgery is another expensive surgical procedure which is a more extensive, mutilating and aggressive process of temporary solution to coronary artery disease. In this operation, the chest is opened in the centre in front. Blood vessels from the leg are surgically removed and used to bypass the coronary arteries which have cholesterol deposits (blockages) in them. In males, as there are no breasts, an artery of the chest is available (internal mammary artery) which may also be used in the operation. The operation is extremely complicated and intricate, and can also have serious and fatal outcome. The heart’s function is maintained by a sophisticated machine known as a Heart Lung Machine. The procedure leaves a mark by a huge scar running down the front of the chest, and one on the leg. Although, with the help of this procedure we are able to bypass the blockages in the main coronary arteries and their major branches, by no means can we operate on the smaller branches of the coronary arteries which also contribute extensively to the reduced supply of blood and oxygen to the muscles of the heart.
Definitely bypass surgery is an abnormal procedure and cannot be an exact replacement of the original. The reblockages would again occur within a gap of 2 to 12 years with an average of 5 years. Those who do not follow a proper life-style can even get a reblockage within a year but those following a very good life-style would not get a reblockage for even 15 years.
Complications of CABG
1.  Respiratory complications
Alveolar dysfunction
Pulmonary oedema
Infection
Phrenic nerve injury
Prolonged ventilatory insufficiency
2. Post-operative hypertension
3. Heart attack (myocardial infarction) during operation
4. Cardiogenic shock
5. Left ventricular failure
6. Cardiac tamponade
7. Septic shock
8. Arrhythmias
Atrial fibrillation
Atrial flutter
Ventricular fibrillation
9. Blood clotting disorders
10. Wound infection, non-healing of wound
11. Peripheral vascular complications
12. Renal failure
13. Gastro-intestinal complications
Bleeding in the stomach, duodenum, shock liver syndrome
14. Reblockages
15. Damage the brain during the heart-lung machine running the blood supply to the brain.
Comment: After surgery (CABG) when someone gets a reblockage after 5 years and gets angina again – it is clear that the blockage is already more than 70% or more. Now suppose this 70% had developed in 5 years – i.e. 14% per year of reblockage. Many people accept it as a normal thing. This may also be calculated as more than 1% reblockage in a month after bypass surgery. How absurdly people still accept ongoing blockage – even after bypass surgery and still do not consider a lifestyle change!
*47/283/5*

HEART DISEASE: BYPASS SURGERY – A ROAD DESTINED TO CLOSECoronary artery bypass grafting (CABG): Coronary artery bypass surgery is another expensive surgical procedure which is a more extensive, mutilating and aggressive process of temporary solution to coronary artery disease. In this operation, the chest is opened in the centre in front. Blood vessels from the leg are surgically removed and used to bypass the coronary arteries which have cholesterol deposits (blockages) in them. In males, as there are no breasts, an artery of the chest is available (internal mammary artery) which may also be used in the operation. The operation is extremely complicated and intricate, and can also have serious and fatal outcome. The heart’s function is maintained by a sophisticated machine known as a Heart Lung Machine. The procedure leaves a mark by a huge scar running down the front of the chest, and one on the leg. Although, with the help of this procedure we are able to bypass the blockages in the main coronary arteries and their major branches, by no means can we operate on the smaller branches of the coronary arteries which also contribute extensively to the reduced supply of blood and oxygen to the muscles of the heart.Definitely bypass surgery is an abnormal procedure and cannot be an exact replacement of the original. The reblockages would again occur within a gap of 2 to 12 years with an average of 5 years. Those who do not follow a proper life-style can even get a reblockage within a year but those following a very good life-style would not get a reblockage for even 15 years.

Complications of CABG1.  Respiratory complications      Alveolar dysfunction       Pulmonary oedema       Infection      Phrenic nerve injury      Prolonged ventilatory insufficiency2. Post-operative hypertension3. Heart attack (myocardial infarction) during operation4. Cardiogenic shock5. Left ventricular failure6. Cardiac tamponade7. Septic shock8. Arrhythmias      Atrial fibrillation       Atrial flutter       Ventricular fibrillation 9. Blood clotting disorders10. Wound infection, non-healing of wound11. Peripheral vascular complications12. Renal failure13. Gastro-intestinal complications      Bleeding in the stomach, duodenum, shock liver syndrome14. Reblockages15. Damage the brain during the heart-lung machine running the blood supply to the brain.
Comment: After surgery (CABG) when someone gets a reblockage after 5 years and gets angina again – it is clear that the blockage is already more than 70% or more. Now suppose this 70% had developed in 5 years – i.e. 14% per year of reblockage. Many people accept it as a normal thing. This may also be calculated as more than 1% reblockage in a month after bypass surgery. How absurdly people still accept ongoing blockage – even after bypass surgery and still do not consider a lifestyle change!*47/283/5*

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